Operation Market Garden

The mission for 101st was to secure the fifteen mile stretch of Hell's Highway from
Eindhoven, including the four bridges, to Veghel. At 1315hrs on the 17th September the
entire regiment landed in Holland and made their way to Zon.
The regiment were a day late in arriving at Eindhoven due to the bridges in Zon having
been blown up but by noon of the day after D-Day the bridges at Eindhoven were taken and
the British moved an armoured unit into the town. Until November 1944, the men of 101st
became familiar with such names as St Oedenrode, Uden, Veghel, Koevering, etc. as they
fought from town to town repelling every counter-attack the enemy launched.
At the end of November found the unit in a former French garrison outside the village
of Mouremelon where they rested and reorganised.
d-day-aerial shot of utah beach (right)
normandy france
Approaching Omaha
German Bunker Normandy
Omaha Beach
Omaha_Beach_Wrecks_D-Day
Falaise Normandy 1944
argentan 1944
go to market garden click this link
Begining


The 101st Airborne Division was activated August 16, 1942 at Camp Claiborne,
Louisiana and placed under the command of Major General William C. Lee.
At the activation ceremony, MG Lee observed, "The 101st...has no history,
but it has a rendezvous with destiny."
In June 1943 the 506th PIR (Parachute Infantry Regiment) were officially
attached to the 101st Airborne Division and moved to Fort Bragg, North Carolina,
where they were stationed until late August.
They departed America on the S.S. Samaria and arrived at Liverpool on 15th September.
Once in England 506th Regiment was stationed in Wiltshire County in villages such
as Aldbourne and Ramsbury.
Invasion of Normandy E company

D-Day Just after midnight on June 6, 1944, the paratroopers of E-Company dropped
into the dark Normandy countryside as part of Operation Overlord, the massive Allied
invasion of France. Disoriented from their first jumps in combat and weighed down with
unnecessary equipment, the men had difficulty find one another and fighting as a unit.
In the chaotic hours after the jump, most of the company remained unaccounted for and
spread over a wide area.
Lieut. Richard Winters led a small squad of men in a daring maneuver
on a German patrol convoy, then successfully captured four German artillery pieces at
Brecourt Manor.
Carentan (D-DAY PLUS TWO) In its successful capture of this Norman town from the Germans,
E-Company came under heavy fire but managed to killed a group of Germans who were
fleeing the site of the battle.
Lieut. Winters suffered a minor leg wound from a sniper; a number of others were killed or
wounded.
The men faced a fierce counter-attack as the Germans attempted to retake the town;
there was heavy shelling and machine-gun fire, as well as tank assault. Overall,
the company suffered 65 casualties during it five weeks in Normandy; 18 men were killed.
Easy Company had greatly distinguished itself - but at a heavy price.
Invasion of Normandy E company

D-Day Just after midnight on June 6, 1944, the paratroopers of E-Company dropped
into the dark Normandy countryside as part of Operation Overlord, the massive Allied
invasion of France. Disoriented from their first jumps in combat and weighed down with
unnecessary equipment, the men had difficulty find one another and fighting as a unit.
In the chaotic hours after the jump, most of the company remained unaccounted for and
spread over a wide area.
Lieut. Richard Winters led a small squad of men in a daring maneuver
on a German patrol convoy, then successfully captured four German artillery pieces at
Brecourt Manor.
Carentan (D-DAY PLUS TWO) In its successful capture of this Norman town from the Germans,
E-Company came under heavy fire but managed to killed a group of Germans who were
fleeing the site of the battle.
Lieut. Winters suffered a minor leg wound from a sniper; a number of others were killed or
wounded.
The men faced a fierce counter-attack as the Germans attempted to retake the town;
there was heavy shelling and machine-gun fire, as well as tank assault. Overall,
the company suffered 65 casualties during it five weeks in Normandy; 18 men were killed.
Easy Company had greatly distinguished itself - but at a heavy price.
Bastogne

Battle of the Bulge - On Dec. 18, 1944, E-Company was sent to Belgium to help defend the
besieged city of Bastogne during the Battle of the Bulge. Allied forces in Bastogne were
essentially surrounded by the Germans, making E-Company's task to "hold the line"
critically important. Digging into their foxholes, in Bois Jacques with frequent
shelling from the well-supplied enemy.
The company experienced the true hardship of war during wintertime: the men had
limited access to food, proper boots or long underwear to defend against the bitter cold,
and were frequently shivering and hungry. On December 26, General George Patton finally
broke the siege, allowing the resupply of food and ammunition to the beleaguered men.
As the Battle of the Bulge continued, Army press releases described the great bravery of
the 101st Airborne soldiers. The press jubilantly named them the "Battered Bastards of
the Bastion of Bastogne".
Final Mission

On 2nd April, 1945 the 101st were moved to Ruhr Pocket to help in operations.
Then on the 4th and 5th of May the 101st carried out their final mission - the capture of
Berchtesgarden, Hitler's Eagles Nest.
The 506th established its command post in Zell Am See after accepting the surrender of
the German LXXXII Corps, commanded by Lt General Theodor Tolsdorf.
After moving to Joigny, France at the end of July the 101st were deactivated on
30th November, 1945.